Why Did Martin Luther King Break Away From The Catholic Church And Post His Demands On The Church Door?

11 Answers

Steve Theunissen Profile
What led to Luther's break with the Catholic church was the practice of selling letters of indulgence. It was the claim of the church that indulgences issued by the pope could shorten the stay of a person, or of a relative, in purgatory. Some even granted forgiveness of sins. Selling such indulgences was one of the avenues used by the church in Luther's day to obtain money.
Since Pope Leo X was hard pressed for funds needed to complete St. Peter's Basilica in Rome, he entered into an agreement with Archbishop Albert of Brandenburg, Germany, that would help with the project. He accepted from Albert the sum of 10,000 ducats in return for the archbishopric of Mainz. That Albert might pay back the sum to the financial house of Fugger, from whom he borrowed it, the pope granted him the privilege of dispensing an indulgence in his territories for a period of eight years. Half of the money received would go to the pope and the other half to the house of Fugger as repayment on the loan.
The Dominican monk Tetzel was entrusted with the sale of these indulgences. He and his fellow vendors made extravagant claims in their sales pitch. Among other things they would say: "As soon as the coin in the coffer rings, the soul from purgatory springs."
Luther was infuriated by such claims. He contended that the granting of indulgences without repentance was contrary to Christian doctrine. He argued: "Indulgences are most pernicious because they introduce complacency and thereby imperil salvation." In one of his sermons in 1516 C.E. he said: "To assert that the pope can deliver souls from purgatory is audacious. If he can do so, then he is cruel not to release them all."
Steve Theunissen Profile
On October 31, 1517, Luther nailed ninety-five theses regarding indulgences on the church door at Wittenberg, Germany. This was the practice in his day for publishing a challenge for a debate. No one accepted his challenge and no discussion of the subject with church officials ever occurred.
Thesis number five said: "The Pope has neither the will nor the power to remit any penalties, except those which he has imposed by his own authority, or by that of the canons." Thesis number twenty-one stated: "Thus those preachers of indulgences are in error who say that, by the indulgences of the Pope, a man is loosed and saved from all punishment."
By thus challenging the church's practice of selling indulgences, Luther unwittingly launched himself on the road to separation from the Catholic church and struck the spark that ignited the Reformation. His theses were translated from Latin to German and printed by some of those who read them. They became a common topic of conversation throughout Germany.
Vicki Kelly Profile
Vicki Kelly answered
Martin Luther was a disillusioned monk.  He had different views from the Catholic Church and pointed out some of the abuses of the Church, which was occurring at that time.  Predominately, the selling of indulgences.   He nailed the demands on the door of the church in Wurzburg, Germany to make a point and to take a stand.  This was the beginning of the Protestant Reformation.
Nathan Corrie Profile
Nathan Corrie answered
For one thing, you are about 400 years out. It was Martin Luther who did the things you say. Martin Luther KING was a 1960's black civil rights leader, and a great visionary. He was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee in April 1968.

Martin Luther was a  16th century German Monk who believed that the world was coming to an end and denounced the Pope as the Antichrist.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
He was declared an outlaw when he would not retract, or take back his teachings
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
He broke away because of the corruption in the catholic church like simony, indulgences, moral laxity and uneducated priest!
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Because he believed that only though faith can you get into haven and there was no need for good deeds
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
The first place you need to reference is Luther's "95 Theses-" its a primary source. I would also seek info on popular opinions or ideas regarding what Luther was doing. Find out where the people stood in terms of feelings toward the church just prior to the 95 Theses. Those results, and the theses itself, should be enough for your assignment. Your instructor obviously wants you to place emphasis on the reactions, and aftermath, of Luther posting his theses. Ok good luck. I 'd like to read when you are finished.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
From my (vague) understanding, only the priests of that time were allowed to read bibles. They manipulated the masses, stealing money and making the church rich. Martin Luther knew about this, being a priest himself, and decided to let the people know. It was a symbolic and rebellious stand against the control of religion, and was even more controversial because Martin Luther himself was a priest.

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