How does the church explain the use or significance of eggs in the christian celebration of Easter?

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7 Answers

Jann Nikka Profile
Jann Nikka answered

"Easter Eggs" is a man made tradition. The Church uses a lot of pagan holidays and traditions to please the people for money.

Millions like the commercial Easter. Egg hunts, chicks, bunnies, eating hams, buying Easter clothes especially hats and shoes.  All which has absolutely nothing to do with the REAL meaning and reason of Easter.

Cindy  Lou Profile
Cindy Lou answered

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_egg

The oldest found decorated egg is 60,000 years old. It is an ostrich egg.

"WIKI-The practice of decorating eggshells is ancient, predating Christian traditions.[8] Ostrich eggs with engraved decoration that are 60,000 years old have been found in Africa.[9] Decorated ostrich eggs, and representations of ostrich eggs in gold and silver, were commonly placed in graves of the ancient Sumerians and Egyptians as early as 5,000 years ago.[10] These may have influenced later customs in Christianity and Islam, according to Nile Green, a historian specializing in Islam in India.[11]"

So.....yup...

EBBe lau Profile
EBBe lau answered

I think it just comes from tradition, maybe you should look it up. For example, I am Lithuanian and we decorate eggs with hot wax before Easter called "marguciai". They are quite beautiful. We also have contests where we each have an egg and we have to hit our egg against someone else's egg, and whoever's egg doesn't crack has the strongest egg.

Check out this website. www.topmarks.co.uk/Easter/EasterEggs.aspx

Tom  Jackson Profile
Tom Jackson answered

Easter eggs

Because the use of eggs was forbidden during Lent, they were brought to the table on Easter Day, coloured red tosymbolize the Easter joy. This custom is found not only in the Latin but also in the Oriental Churches. The symbolicmeaning of a new creation of mankind by Jesus risen from the dead was probably an invention of later times. Thecustom may have its origin in paganism, for a great many pagan customs, celebrating the return of spring, gravitated to Easter. The egg is the emblem of the germinating life of early spring. Easter eggs, the children are told, come fromRome with the bells which on Thursday go to Rome and return Saturday morning. The sponsors in some countries give Easter eggs to their god-children. Coloured eggs are used by children at Easter in a sort of game which consists in testing the strength of the shells (Kraus, Real-Encyklopædie, s.v. Ei). Both coloured and uncoloured eggs are used in some parts of the United States for this game, known as "egg-picking". Another practice is the "egg-rolling" by children on Easter Monday on the lawn of the White House in Washington.

The Easter rabbit

The Easter Rabbit lays the eggs, for which reason they are hidden in a nest or in the garden. The rabbit is a pagan symbol and has always been an emblem of fertility (Simrock, Mythologie, 551).


http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05224d.htm

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Tom  Jackson
Tom Jackson commented
Glad I was at least slightly on target.

As to your comment about "not completely explaining," I'm not sure I can; but I did answer---on a personal opinion basis as a Christian, specifically a Catholic---a similar inquiry within the last year from a Wiccan.

Basically I said---and still think---that we who consider ourselves "soaked" in the "goodness" of the Abrahamic God in Whom we believe see Him present in anything that seems to be what most humans would judges as a "good" thing; and I consider the Easter egg to be at least "harmless" and also "cool" for the kids.

Generally speaking, which may or may not put a more understandable spin on my attitude, I think that the comments that many make about how Christianity has appropriated the tales found in various pagan cultures are probably true; but I think it just goes in favor of the concept of the "Economy of Salvation" created by God in order to make so many different generations and cultures of mankind ready to appreciate the redemption of man by God that we celebrate from Palm Sunday through Easter.

And I admit that the above carriers neither the "Imprimata" nor the "Nihil abstat," or even the Imprimi Potest." .

Regards
Tom  Jackson
Tom Jackson commented
carries not carriers
Walt O'Reagun
Walt O'Reagun commented
Funny how the Abrahamic god was against incorporating "pagan" practices in the Old Testament ... but seems to have no problem with it among modern believers.

Just sayin'
Darik Majoren Profile
Darik Majoren answered

It comes from the Pagan religion that was in place prior to the Church deciding it's date of holiday based what the First council of Nicea decided . . . In other words men decided that this date was to be claimed for THEIR religion.

The original Germanic holiday was called Ēostre and the custom of eggs are part of this holiday along with the hares (rabbits, bunnies).

"The heathen Easter had much in common with May-feast and the reception of spring, particularly in matter of bonfires. Then, through long ages there seem to have lingered among the people Easter-games so-called, which the church itself had to tolerate : I allude especially to the custom of Easter eggs, and to the Easter tale which preachers told from the pulpit for the people's amusement, connecting it with Christian reminiscences. The heathen Easter had much in common with May-feast and the reception of spring, particularly in matter of bonfires. Then, through long ages there seem to have lingered among the people Easter-games so-called, which the church itself had to tolerate : I allude especially to the custom of Easter eggs, and to the Easter tale which preachers told from the pulpit for the people's amusement, connecting it with Christian reminiscences" - MORE INFORMATION

Cookie Roma Profile
Cookie Roma answered

The church does not explain the "Easter egg". The whole Easter eggs, or Easter bunny  thing has nothing to do with ANY religion. 

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