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How To Write A Welcome Speech For A Church Black History Program?

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Connor Sephton Subber Profile
Welcome speeches by their very nature are meant to be short, sharp and functional. That doesn’t mean they cannot be memorable, but you must always bear in mind that you are there to welcome people to the church, maybe people who haven’t been to a church for a while so it also needs to be friendly as well as informative. Try to think about who will be in the audience and what you remember from attending previous Black History Programs whether at this church of other churches.
If you are not the organiser of the Black History Program, then find out who is and ask them about what the day will entail. Pepper your speech with the highlights of the forthcoming program. Don’t worry you will not be stealing the thunder from the other people involved in the day, instead you will be building anticipation for the future events. Make sure to thank everyone involved in the organisation and deliverance of the program to double make sure that this happens. Also enquire of the organiser whether any notices will be needed to be delivered during this welcome speech, such as fire procedural information.
Remember that a speech is at its most engaging when it is delivered from the heart and in your own words.
OK so if you are looking for a structure for your welcome speech, I’d start with welcoming everyone present, making sure you speak to the whole room. Next set out the activities you have planned for the day, followed by an explanation of the activities and an explanation of why you’re doing a Black History Program and why it is important. The more personal this segment is, the more striking it will be for your audience but you must temper this with the fact that this is a welcome speech and must be kept reasonably short and snappy. You may want to add a short prayer here, but that will have to be your carefully considered call as some of your audience may not be regular church goers and are in attendance for the Black History program only and this turn of events may throw them slightly.
Remember to include a final thank you to everyone for attending and sitting through your speech.
Practise your speech at least twice before delivering it. This will give you more confidence and will allow you to iron out any potential tongue twisters before the day. Also make sure you have several copies of the speech on your person.
nettie Profile
nettie answered
Welcome, everyone to a evening of celebration and information about black history, open your hearts and minds and enjoy...hope this gets you at least started
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
I would like to welcome each and everyone of you to our annual Black history program.
First, I would like to remind you of the great thing that has occurred in our time. We now,
for the very first time in history we have Barack Obama a black man as the president of the united states.Dr.King "I had a dream" speech has come true.

As stated by Marcus Garvey "A people without a knowledge of their history is like a tree without roots."Let's not be like the tree,but like the bright people we are and absorb our
history, and again Welcome to our program.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Giving Honor to my Heavenly Father, to Pastor Seals and Lady Seals I am Honored
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
I do the speech's for everything at my church I'm 15 yr.old and yes I love the lord but I really do not know what to say this time please help me...
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous , yes, answered

Goodmorning everyone i would like to welcome you to our program as we celebrate black history. For hundreds of years since the days of slavery blacks have had to fight an uphill battle just to obtain basic human rights. As stated by Marcus Garvey "a people without knowledge of their history is like a tree without  roots" So we thank you for coming out as we become more knowledgable about our history thank you

Two Cents Profile
Two Cents answered
How about Martin Luther King Jr.  He was not only a civil rights leader but a Reverend.

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